The Successful Secret To Make Cats Love Benadryl

Did you ever experience an allergic reaction? I was once bitten by a horsefly at a concert and my eyelid swelled out like I had a black eye from a fight. It wasn’t pretty. Luckily, a medical team was nearby and I was given a dose of an anti-histamine, Benadryl. I was soon as right as rain.

Imagine if your cat were to suffer an allergic reaction. It can be unpleasant thing seeing your pet suffering needlessly. You may feel helpless wondering if you can give an antihistamine like Benadryl to your cat. An allergic reaction can be serious; in the worst case scenario if anaphylaxis occurs, it can lead to death.

Consult with your vet

As with an allergic reaction in people, when your cat experiences an allergic reaction, whether it be mild or severe, it is always a good precaution to consult your veterinarian for advice. It is always better to be safe than sorry.

What are the symptoms?

It is critical to the safety and well being of your cat that you can distinguish between mild and more severe symptoms. Look out for red lips, red eyes and hives; these indicate a mild case of allergic reaction.

The symptoms of anaphylaxis are much more dramatic; these include seizures, vomiting, breathing difficulties, uncontrolled bowel movements and urination, lethargy and collapse. In this situation, you should call your veterinarian for assistance.

It is important that when looking at the symptoms that you consider all the symptoms in the round. If you detect just some of these signs,it may not be the case that your cat is presenting with anaphylaxis.

Is it safe to give your cat Benadryl?

​The short answer is Yes. According to John Faught, a medical director, “Benadryl is just an antihistamine, and it’s relatively safe for both dogs and cats.”That’s reassuring.

​You the pet owner should be aware that, as with any medication,there may be side effects. Benadryl may cause your cat to get drowsy or,alternatively, hyper.

​Care must be taken with doses. Overdoses can lead to seizures,breathing difficulties, coma, and even in death in the worst case scenario. It is important that you always seek medical advice from your vet and read instructions carefully.

​You should consult with your vet to see if the Benadryl might interfere with other medication your pet is taking.

​What is it used for?

​Benadryl is usually used to treat itchiness, allergic skin reactions or bug bites. It may be also useful in treating vaccine reactions.

​Families bringing their cat on long car trips can also use it as a mild sedative. It is known to work as an anti-nausea or motion sickness medication. However, ideally you use a medication that is specifically designed for that purpose.

​How do you get your cat to take the medicine?

​Cats are well known for being fussy eaters, so getting your cat to consume. If possible, syringe the Benadryl directly into its mouth; that is, if your cat is being co-operative for you. If your cat doesn’t like the taste or odor, you can disguise it with other flavours.

​According to Teresa Travers, “If your cat won’t take it, you can try going through a compounding pharmacy where the staff can flavor the liquid with chicken, fish or another cat-approved taste, which may increase the chance of your feline taking it.”

​Debi Matlack, a Veterinary Technician, says that the liquid is very bitter and recommends giving Benadryl in pill form instead. “A pill may be easier to get down without her tasting it. For my cat on Benadryl I have to wrap it in a little bit of Pill Pocket and poke it down anyway, she won't eat it on her own. A device called a pill popper may be of help.”

​What is the recommended dosage?

​The recommended dosage of Benadryl for cats is 1 mg per pound,given up to three times daily.

​If your cat is an average weight of 10 pounds, then the correct dosage from a 25-milligram tablet is simply half of it. In its liquid form, you need to administer four milliliters as the concentration is typically 12.5mg/5ml.

​What is causing your cat’s allergy?

​While antihistamine can treat the symptoms, it is worth investigating what the underlying causes may be. Does your cat have mites or some form of infection? Are there any environmental factors that may be causing a reaction? You may be only masking the problem and not dealing with the underlying causes.

​Cats sometimes get allergies to the food they are eating. Cats may show signs of this by scratching their heads or necks, or they have problems like diarrhoea and vomiting.

​“Cats who develop allergies have usually been exposed to substances- either airborne, in food, applied to their skin or transmitted by fleas-that they can not tolerate.”

​There are host of substances that some cats may be allergic to.These include pollens from trees, grass, weeds, cold, mildew or dust. Another obvious source is fleas; if your cat has fleas, then simply giving it anantihistamine alone won’t remedy the problem. You will need to treat the fleas too.

​Other sources for allergies include perfumes, cleaning products,cigarette smoke, fabrics and rubber and plastic materials.

​As the pet owner, you should undergo a process of elimination to try to pinpoint the source. When did your cat first show signs? Do you remember anything in the environment that might have occurred prior to these symptoms?

​What should you do if you suspect your cat has an allergy?

​As mentioned earlier, it is a good idea to see your vet. Your vet can take a complete history and do a physical examination to find the source of the problem. Failing that, the next course of action would be to do blood or skin tests and/or an elimination diet.

​Hopefully, by that stage you will determine and eliminate the source of the problem, and then treat your cat with Benadryl.

Treating Flea Allergies in Cats

Your cat will soon be on the mend

As discussed, the key secret to success in treating your cat is first to check the symptoms, consult your vet, and tackle the allergy with an appropriate dosage of Benadryl, in liquid or tablet form. Also, it is well worth checking out those Pill Pockets; they are a great way to hide the medicine in your cat’s food and they will love it without realising they are eating it! Finally, get to the cause of the allergy, by completing a history with your Vet. Please leave a comment below if you have any question.

Emma Thompson
 

Hi, I'm Emma Thompson. Welcome to The Pet Town! I'm a Pet lovers like you and please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Enjoy your stay!

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