How Long Do Teacup Poodles Live?

As the name suggests, a Teacup Poodle is in fact a toy-sized dog breed. Teacup Poodles are not official dog breeds, as you must have already guessed it. They’re smaller than Toy Poodles and they’re very popular in America.

For their small size, Teacup Poodles can live for as long as 12 to 15 years. Since they’re bred as companion dogs, they’re also sold as hypoallergenic dogs. Weighing less than 6 pounds, they’re delightful creatures.

You can buy a Teacup Poodle in white, cream, black, or red. They’re intelligent, playful, and easy to train. But what about health issues? What can possibly affect their lifespan that you don’t know of?

Let’s find out.

How Long Do Teacup Poodles Live?

Teacup Poodles can live for 12 to 15 years. Even more, if they are not suffering from specific health issues. If you ask the vet for more information about pet Poodles, this is more than enough information for you.

For Teacup Poodles, good-quality food, exercise, and neutering are necessary. This ensures your pet lives a long and healthy life.

What Causes Death In Teacup Poodles?

When you see a Teacup Poodle, the first thing that crosses your mind is their weight. Even though there is no official registration for Teacup Poodles. Their average weight is from 2-and-a-half to 6 pounds in fully grown, adult condition.

That is why Teacup Poodles can have plenty of weight and other health problems. Scientifically speaking, Teacup Poodles, all through their puppyhood and adulthood, are considered as premature.

They need extra attention and care. It’s expensive enough to purchase a Teacup Poodle as they cost more than $1,500. If you end up with a sick or a weak Teacup Poodle, medical expenses keep piling on.

So the talk of the town is that buying Teacup Poodles is a bad idea. But if you still are considering them as a pet. Here’s what you should know about common diseases and other health issues.

Health Risks

The most common issues that Teacup Poodles suffer from are as follows.

Hypoglycemia is high blood sugar in dogs. If it persists, it can cause diabetes and heart problems. Poor nutrition, lack of exercise, and high-stress levels can also contribute to this condition.

Next are heart defects. If your Teacup Poodle is coughing or has difficulty breathing, this may be the cause. Generally, Poodles suffer from heart defects due to genetic or chronic factors. Symptoms of which may occur early on in puppyhood or in old age.

Another serious health risk in Teacup Poodles is a collapsed trachea. This shouldn’t be surprising considering the sheer size and shape of a Teacup Poodle.

If your dog experiences bouts of coughing after eating food, drinking water, or exercising. Difficulty in breathing or loud breathing noises are also signed. This could indicate that your dog is having difficulties in breathing due to a collapsed trachea.

Such respiratory diseases are very common in Teacup Poodles. And they also contribute to their death.

Other problems such as digestive issues and arthritis are common. Having said that, Teacup Poodles are genetically predisposed to dental issues. Sometimes, their baby teeth don’t fall out. And they may have to be surgically removed by a vet.

These health risks clearly state that a Teacup Poodle can live for 2 to 3 years. Or if they’re lucky, they can live for 12 years! But there’s no guarantee that they will be healthy and active all these years.

Size

I don’t have to tell you that Teacup Poodles are tiny, tiny, tiny. This translates to them having weaker and thinner bones. This means they cannot withstand climate changes from hot to cold to hot again.

This also means you cannot play rough with him or get them overexcited! If they jump from one high surface to another. Or from furniture to furniture. Or from a high chair to the floor. They are at risk of breaking a bone or injuring a body part.

When you take your Poodle out for a walk, you have to make sure you keep them on a tight leash. Or else have them run around your backyard for a few minutes at a time. Taking them to the dog park with big dogs around is a bad idea.

Injuries and trauma are expected if you decide to take things lightly with a Teacup Poodle.

Their size also affects surgical procedures. A standard IV needle is too big for a 3-pound Poodle. You will have to find an experienced doctor. This means paying higher for medicines, treatment, and other medical expenses.

Teacup Poodles’ survival rate from falling down the stairs, getting attacked by a big dog, or an accident is not positive. They even get scared or anxious fast which causes heart problems, seizures, palpitations, and skin conditions.

From all this, both you and I can gather that buying Teacup Poodles is a bad idea. And in case you’re rescuing one, you have to be very vigilant about their livelihood.

Final Thoughts

Professionals advise against the breeding of Teacup Poodles for a reason. They’re not the healthiest dog breeds on the market. They suffer from a lot of health problems. And on a more personal level, they can be a nuisance for an owner to pay for.

Having said that, the lifespan of a Teacup Poodle is unexpected. Even though you can cut back on feeding expenses as they do not eat a lot of food. That’s the only advantage one can think of about Teacup Poodles. The rest of it depends on the genetic factors of the dog.

The consistent breeding of Teacup Poodles can shorten their lifespan. A healthy Poodle can live for 12 to 15 years. But a sick Poodle can live for only 2 to 5 years.

With congenital birth defects, infections, high blood sugar, and weak bones. It’s harder to take care of a Teacup Poodle. Not to mention, it’s way more expensive! They look cute and are an instant hit with family and friends. But they’re not the healthiest choice for a pet.

Emma Thompson
 

Hi, I'm Emma Thompson. Welcome to The Pet Town! I'm a Pet lovers like you and please feel free to get in touch with any questions. Enjoy your stay!

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